Thoughts on a Sunday morning

I have always been fascinated by mythology. Recently I’ve been reading up about mythology in the bible and this inspired me to create this composite photograph. Mythology is older than the bible and I wonder now if the bible  is (partly) build on myths. Mythology is not restricted to one particular culture; it’s a global phenomena interwoven through all cultures. I also discovered that there are different bible versions depending on which Christian religion. For example: Deut 32:33 “Their wine is the poison of dragons” or “…. is the venom of serpents”. 

Wether it’s Scandinavian-, Aboriginal-, Venda- or biblical mythology the meaning of the different symbols is the same throughout the different cultures (religions) around the globe.

Eagles (35 times mentioned in the bible), for example, symbolises  the good and protection against evil; Owls stand for wisdom but mostly mentioned in a negative context (Leviticus 11:13-19); Serpents/Snakes (44 times in the bible) are evil as are dragons (35 times in the bible). History shows that the bible has been rewritten numerous times during the first 14-15 centuries by the Roman Catholic Church and after that also by its ‘spin-off’ (Calvin/Luther/etc.) churches. The essence of mythology in the bible however remained the same.

For the second photo-graphic imaginary I used elements from Norwegian mythology (Norske Miögatör), which also inspired JRR Tolkien, and added the known Christian peace symbol (dove) which also occurs in native American and Celtic myths. This composite was made for the festivities last September in Tulbagh (Western Cape, South Africa) commemorating the earthquake in 1969 .

Snap impression of the Greyton Art Walk

What a well organised event. 70 artists around the village and we (me and my wife Yvonne) were in the center of it all; in the Art Hall.

Wonderland

As mentioned in the previous posting our village (Napier, Western Cape, South Africa) has talent. There are many initiatives to bring different communities/cultures (‘heritage’ of Apartheids syndrome’) together. One of these is the annual production of a theatre play. Two years ago it was ‘Cinderella; last year ‘Peter Pan’ and recently ‘Wonderland’ (based on Alice in Wonderland). And … it was a spectacle!!!

The productions are all privately funded (forget about politics: -promises, promises …..) and numerous volunteers involved in dress- and decor making, styling, make up, etc. etc.

Napier is a small town (village if you like) in the heart of the Overberg region; small but with a big heart. There are a few things in which the village is in the top of South Africa. Nowhere in the country are there so many working community initiatives per capita as in this village and, also because of that, it is statistically the safest pace in the Western Cape (also thanks to preventive measurements of the local police in co-junction with communities).

Anyway: it is ‘Wonderland’ in Napier. Here a selection of images (low light 1600 ISO, A 5.6 S between 0.5 and 1/60)

Local Talent

Napier (South Africa) has got talent; we all saw that recently with the theatre spectacle ‘Wonderland’ in the School of Skills in Napier (next posting).

A talent is also Abigail Camille. Many know her as one of the faces of ‘Pascal of Napier’ (local cuisine). I’ve used her a few times as a model and although she still has to learn a few tricks she’s got the potential to become a great photo model (if she wants) 
Abigail Camille has many faces and goes up in different surroundings like a chameleon. I had the privilege to work with her on several occasions this year (with thanks to a.o. Vanilla Boutique and Jeremy Shoe Repair and Locksmith in Bredasdorp and Yvonne de Wit Jewellery in Napier (Okay; the last one does not count for she is my wife for life . Soon I hope to work again with her and if everything works out she will have the opportunity in the beginning of 2020 to learn a few tricks-of-the-trade from a well known African super model with whom I have another session.