Category Archives: art

King of the Jungle (several images)

The average wildlife photographer is always under guidance of a game ranger. I don’t like that. Sometimes one has to take a calculated risk. So I went to observe a lion somewhere in South Africa. It’s rare that I publish fully processed photos on the internet. This is one of my exceptions: My all time favourite King of the Jungle.

World’s top wildlife photographer Laurent Baheux inspired me not to be afraid. Click on the portfolio link of his website.

All in B&W/monochrome

 

The Beauty in the dust

(Ode to my wife Yvonne de Wit who designs and create original jewellery from treasures of the South African Earth)

 

“The moon is bland in colour. I call it shades of grey … And to find orange soil on the moon was a surprise.” Gene Cernan, astronaut, Apollo 10, Apollo 17

When artist Yvonne de Wit came to South Africa from her native Netherlands, it was with an open mind and with what became a growing fascination in the different types of rock and soils that the southern part of this great and diverse continent had to offer.

Through experimentation, she discovered that grinding diverse stones and pieces of rock found in different locations, offered up extraordinary colours, unusual ‘dusts’ that, when framed in silver, produced jewelry that reflected the land in a very different way.

Ideally, one needs to handle each piece of her collections to see, understand and appreciate the skill with which she works. Consider her chandelier earrings, for example. The artist explains that she picked up stones, ground them finely and then felt they would work as three ‘pendants’ from the ear. But they needed to balance. If one looks at the final pieces, one will see how delicately, intricately and exquisitely each hangs, individually, from a tiny common point. They are not soldered together; each of the three pendants somehow hangs perfectly in place. And in harmony with its opposite piece on the other ear.

For the artist, this says something about nature, and our place in it. How, ideally, our relationship with soil, air and water should be in perfect balance. How delicate that relationship is. And what surprises the dust of the earth harbours for us, despite our many preconceptions. Like the astronaut who expected shades of grey on the moon — and found orange. While Yvonne has an innate connection to the soil beneath her feet, she recognises that water has an inevitable and appealing connection. During whale- watching in Hermanus one year, she was fascinated not just by the creatures themselves, but also by their habits. The result? Her finely crafted ‘whale’ pendant. No, it is not the animal itself she has re-created (although many might think so). The artist was entranced by the very fine combination of water and air, expelled from the blow-hole as the whale rises to the surface and exhales. Yvonne has captured a moment essential to life on earth — exhalation before inhalation.

#Design and #CreationYvonne de Wit – Jewellery
#PhotoModelMaggie Chinjati Mhango and Lauren Kehl
#Portraiture #Photography Herman van Bon

 

Review by Kappuccetto Rosso

This just made my day:

“Herman Van Bon is a fine art photographer originally from Netherlands that currently lives in Napier, South Africa. He covers topics from landscapes to portraits and has an exquisite eye for detail that makes his photographs transcend the immediate exploring metaphors of ancestral worlds. 
His creation is joining the earthly with the celestial with a splendid poetic touch that transforms his photographs into magical universes that captivate viewers´ eyes and emotions. 
He has the heart of a poet something reflected in his haikus and how he deals with his artistic inquisitiveness mixing different media graphic tools to get to beautiful imaginary photographs”. – Kappuccetto Rosso in GigArte

At the Zeitz 2

The Zeitz museum of Contemposity Art Africa in Cape Town is one of those new additions that has to attract tourists.

A few personal notes:

  1. Architect Thomas Heatherwick (UK) performed an almost impossible task to transform old concrete silos into a state of the art museum and hotel with maintaining the origin designation in its look.
  2. The exhibited art reminds me to the ‘revolutionary art’ of the sixties (inspired by student revolts etc.) with the difference that what’s on display in Zeitz is more polished (thanks to modern technology)  and shows more guns and violence (African interpretation). Artists like Jean-Luc Godard, Yoko Ono and Wim T. Schippers must have been inspiring the African artists. But there are also some surprises like a few video installations and black and white portraits. But bricks and bottles hanging on a ceiling, for example; have seen that numerous times in the far away past. That only adds to the general excepted perception that Cape Town is one of the three main copy-cat cities in the world.

A bit of art: