Hermanus FynArts

Every year there is this art festival in Hermanus, Western Cape, South Africa. Plenty of sculptures along the Cliff Path but not this year. It’s a meager outdoor exhibition but the few sculptures I saw are interesting. The event, including some concerts, workshops, etc. started last Thursday and ends this Sunday 18 June.

More worthwhile is to visit the different art galleries. Their level has gone up significantly in the past few years and some of them can match themselves with the best in South Africa and abroad. There are 11 of them (if I’m not mistaken) and all within walking distance. Four artists from my village have work on display in Van Rossouw Frans Mulder), Originals (Ulrich Riek), Hermanus Gallery (Yvonne de Wit) and Walker Bay Gallery (me).

Here a few images of the outdoor event.

 

Off the beaten track

I’m living in a small town through which the main road between Cape Town and the Southernmost tip of the African Continent runs. ‘Runs’, indeed for most tourists are racing in high speed mode from one ‘attraction’ to the other. It’s a pity to see people not experiencing the real beauty of a wonderful countryside. Sometimes I think; why not turn left or right into a gravel road and get lost … in a wonderful landscape with ever changing skies throughout the seasons. Yes; one can pick up some of that on the main road but it’s incomparable with the real thing. Our Swiss friends are visiting South Africa virtually every year and although they drive rural pace in the countryside they never got the idea to go into the deep … So I took them out one early morning. Yes, we also did the Southernmost Tip, for that was still on their list, but after the off the beaten track tour they had seen it there within a few minutes; the shipwreck nearby was far more interesting as was the illegal dumpsite of Cape Nature Conservation in a protected nature reservation (sad story), etc. etc. Oh … and we also went to Elim and in Arniston we had lunch in a place virtually all tourists/tour operators have yet to discover….

Well this is my contribution to this weeks photo challenge. Pictures all taken 23 March 2017 between 5:30 AM and approx. 2:00 PM and they clearly show the ever changing skies and the effect it has on the photos

From the Shoebox: Salisbury and Stonehenge (4 pictures)

In 1970 I visited the UK for the first time on an ‘Easy Rider’ like motorbike. Since then I’ve been there several times; I even lived in Bath for a couple of years (with intervals) between 1974 and 1978.

The last times I was in Brexit-country was in 1998 and 1999. Anyway: Salisbury and surrounds have always attracted me and virtually every time I was in England I detoured.

The Salisbury cathedral is one of the most beautiful ones in the world; especially from an architectural point of view.

 

The cathedral is in the town centre but from the park in front you walk between meadows into a forest along a creek to the old water mill.

 

 

Stonehenge has intrigued me from the first time I was there but has become too much of a touristic attraction with all kinds of (understandable) restrictions. South African born Noeline Smith lives in this area and she makes the most wonderful pictures.

These scanned pictures are from the nineties and although kept cool and dry the original print quality detoriated.

 

Jessica

Jessica, a Class 19D locomotive, number 3321, was built in England in 1948 and one of the 235 of its type  built for the South African Railways between 1937 and 1949 in the UK, East Europe and Germany. The steam locomotive was restored by the Ceres Rail Company which, at the moment is undertaking two more restorations of Class 19B and Class 26 locomotives. Ceres Rail Company organizes trips and events which brings in the money for preserve and promote South African Rail Heritage, which, according to their website, involves restoring and refurbishing old locomotives and coaches.

Jessica

Jessica, a Class 19D locomotive, number 3321, was built in England in 1948 and one of the 235 of its type built for the South African Railways between 1937 and 1949 in the UK, East Europe and Germany. The steam locomotive was restored by the Ceres Rail Company which, at the moment is undertaking two more restorations of Class 19B and Class 26 locomotives. Ceres Rail Company organizes trips and events which brings in the money for preserve and promote South African Rail Heritage, which, according to their website, involves restoring and refurbishing old locomotives and coaches.