Miniature landscapes in a small garden 8

We only have a small garden plus a lawn with a border for our dog. The succulent garden (4 patches) measures about 80 square meters and is home to around 600 different registered species. Some of the plants are naturally multiplying (always a healthy sign for a garden)  and of some we take cuttings which we plant nearby the parent plant. In total, wild guess;  probably around 1000-1100 plants of this surface. Within the garden we try to create miniature landscapes sometimes hidden between rocks or bigger plants and sometimes part of a bigger patch with more spheres. Why not share a selection of 8 different ones?

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Growing with the wind

White Milkwood  (Sideroxylon inerme) occur mainly in coastal areas in Southern Africa and they tend to grow with the wind.

Here a few along the ‘Wandelpad’ (hiking trail) in our village.

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The little rocker

Lithops are an amazing genus within the plant family of the Aizoaceae. These little suckers are also named living stones and you’ll find many of them in Southern Africa. If you search for them along the banks of the Orange River near Aurabies Falls in the Northern Cape it might be that you are walking on them so much stone-alike they occur in nature. The one in the pot is a gift from one of our plant friends and we look after it as we’ve grown it from seeds ourselves. There are more local names for this ‘little rocker’. What about ‘Bok Voetjies’ (Deer Feet) or ‘Baba Boudjies’ (Baby Buttocks)?

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A historical event in the village …

… but not many are aware of it: The first flower of the Stenocereus beneckei has opened after months in the bud. Not only just opened but it seemingly needed a gale force wind last night. This morning to our big surprise, coming back from a rainy and stormy hike along the beach during sunrise,  one of the buds was open. Don’t think that anyone else would have noticed but with out garden eyes we focus it all. These cacti from central Mexico are supposed to bloom during Summer and NOT supposed to flower in a moderate subtropical climate of this village but it does and at a moment (South African Winter) that nobody expects.

Well here are some pictures  I quickly shot beween two showers:

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Whale Watching

Just to attract more tourists the tourism bureau in Hermanus announced that the first whales were spotted. This turned out to be a hoax for nobody living and working along the coastline has seen one yet…. Even the subsidized ‘Whale Horn Blower’ (guy who blows the horn when a whale is seen) hasn’t been spotted… But we saw this morning a whale tail coming out of the water …. of a fountain…

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