The Southernmost shipwreck of the African Continent

The Southernmost coastal shipwreck of the African Continent.

Head down around the southernmost spot on the African continent, and you’ll find an atmospheric shipwreck waiting just off the shore. The surviving fragment of the doomed vessel rusts atop the rocks, where it’s constantly battered by the wind and waves.

The Meisho Maru No. 38 was a small Japanese fishing vessel that, like so many others, prowled the seas to reap its bounty. This part of South Africa’s coast is notoriously dangerous, causing many ships to succumb to its wrath.

The Meisho Maru No. 38 met its end on November 16, 1982. A storm caused it to run aground. Fortunately, because it sank so close to shore, all 17 members of its crew were able to swim to safety, leaving the ship as the only casualty.

After spending decades being beaten by the elements, the wrecked vessel finally broke apart. For now, its prow still rests in place, though it’s likely the sea may one day claim that as well. If you’re in the area and like shipwrecks, you’ll want to be sure to see it before it’s gone. (with thanks to Monique Bentall )

The ‘Metaphoorto’

From yesterday to 10 October:

I call it a ‘metaphoorto’ 
It was first exhibited during the UNESCO exhibition ‘The Invisible-Visible’ in Oslo (Norway) last year together with two other pictures of me. Selected by curator Georgeta Negrini (former photography curator of Prado in Madrid) amongst work of 128 other photographers around the globe. Since Oslo ‘African Feet’ is travelling the world (via UNESCO). From August 9 to October 10 of this year a print  is on display during the exhibition ‘Contemporary Art Africa’ in Ilienworth, Cuxhaven, Germany. I’m one of the 70 chosen artists of the African Continent.
Prints on 300 gsm Hahnemuller paper of 120x80cm are made available for sale. This exhibition is curated by Samuel Fleiner.

Off the beaten track

I’m living in a small town through which the main road between Cape Town and the Southernmost tip of the African Continent runs. ‘Runs’, indeed for most tourists are racing in high speed mode from one ‘attraction’ to the other. It’s a pity to see people not experiencing the real beauty of a wonderful countryside. Sometimes I think; why not turn left or right into a gravel road and get lost … in a wonderful landscape with ever changing skies throughout the seasons. Yes; one can pick up some of that on the main road but it’s incomparable with the real thing. Our Swiss friends are visiting South Africa virtually every year and although they drive rural pace in the countryside they never got the idea to go into the deep … So I took them out one early morning. Yes, we also did the Southernmost Tip, for that was still on their list, but after the off the beaten track tour they had seen it there within a few minutes; the shipwreck nearby was far more interesting as was the illegal dumpsite of Cape Nature Conservation in a protected nature reservation (sad story), etc. etc. Oh … and we also went to Elim and in Arniston we had lunch in a place virtually all tourists/tour operators have yet to discover….

Well this is my contribution to this weeks photo challenge. Pictures all taken 23 March 2017 between 5:30 AM and approx. 2:00 PM and they clearly show the ever changing skies and the effect it has on the photos