Sunday Special

From Wikipedia: “Mourvèdre (also known as Mataró or Monastrell) is a red wine grape variety that is grown in many regions around the world including the Rhône and Provence regions of France, the Valencia and Jumilla denominaciones de origen of Spain”.

Yesterday we were at Fraai Uitzicht 1798 in Robertson, one of the few cellars in South Africa that produce wine of this grape variety. Fraai Uitzicht 1798 is the meeting place for some of the best wine makers in South Africa. The cellar dates back to 1740 and is one of the oldest of its kind in South Africa with the original fermentation tanks. 1798 was the year the homestead was build. The cellar produces around 25000 bottles per year and these find their way to guests in their own accommodation and restaurant and to collectors around the globe.

Le Neuf Papesch; pour ‘Le vrai Connaisseur’

 

This is one of those extreme rare occasions I write about wine. I learned to appreciate a good wine many, many years ago in some of the most renown French wine producing regions and then I’m not talking about the known French ‘Chateaux’ but about those small wine farms that mail order their wines (sometimes over several generations) to their wine-loving clientele throughout the own country. After 17 years in South Africa I finally discovered a red wine that surprised me. I’m not a red wine drinker, well… not in South Africa for the simple reason that most of the South African wine makers add extra sulphites (and sometimes even additional preservatives) on top of the natural sulphite content and that upsets my stomach. The wine I’m writing about is ‘Le Neuf Papesch’ (excusez le pun s’il vous plait) and is created by proprietor Karl-Uwe Papesch of ‘Fraai Uitzicht 1798‘ in the Robertson Wine Valley. This valley counts over 40 wine cellars of which De Wetshof and Graham Beck are internationally known for their mass produced quality wines. There are however also small ’boutique cellars’ that see the bulk of their (relatively small) produce go overseas but these are locally not always well promoted and that’s fine for experience learns that ‘Le vrai Connaisseur’ has a nose for these wineries. Fraai Uitzicht 1798 is a working farm with a 4 star guesthouse and a ‘highly acclaimed’ (what a cliché … but it is what it is) restaurant.
A few days ago friends of us from Europe got a few bottles of ‘Le Neuf Papesch’ when they came to stay with us. They got the wine at Fraai Uitzicht; the only place where you can get it within this country but it also seems online available in Germany. All bottles are individually numbered.
Now I first have to tell you something about wine tasting.There are a few simple rules: if you smell the wine as soon as the bottle is opened it’s an extreme poor quality (even though the taste is ‘smooth’); if you smell it when poured in the glass; have doubts but as soon as you have to stick your nose into the glass to discover the different fragrances it’s pure quality (even if it’s not your favourite taste). My experience with ‘Le Neuf Papesch’ is one of those rare occasions that I had to stick my nose deep into the glass to indulge my taste buds (yes I always taste wine with my nose); such a rich full bodied ‘palette’ with so many ‘hints’ that I relived my French wine tasting years. Now you might wonder which grape variety(/ies) Karl-Uwe Papesch used for this extra-ordinary wine. I invite you to discover that yourself.
A few notes of importance: Wine tasting is a personal experience; with other words what I like does not mean that you like it as well. Secondly: selling wine is like telling a story; many people who like the story also tend to like the wine even if it’s wine of poor quality ….

P.S. One of my friends asked me about the meaning of the hand (2nd picture). Here you can read about it:

THE Garden at Fraai Uitzicht 1798

Today I checked the garden we created 2 years ago at Guesthouse Fraai Uitzicht 1798 (4* rated) in the Klaas Voogds Valley near Robertson in the Western Cape, South Africa.

It still looks good despite a little backlog in maintenance (due to ‘awesome busy season’) but at the moment 2 staff members weeding. Soon we plant the ‘filling up’.

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African Renaissance

All pictures in this blog are ‘imaginary’ and this one is no exception; it’s my own interpretation of ‘African Renaissance‘. I’ve kept it to our own environment here in Stanford, South Africa. Though on first sight ‘dull’; come to live the life here to discover a wonderful and inspirational village somewhere in nowhere between Hermanus and Gansbaai in the Western Cape. The mainframe picture I’ve used before. It’s the original entrance of the Sir Robert Stanford Estate along the R43 that connects us with both mentioned towns. I changed the surface of the road into more authentic gravel from the nearby Papiesvlei Road. The sculptures are ‘borrowed’ from Fraai Uitzicht 1798 in Robertson and the rest (birds -Stanford = ‘bird capital’ in South Africa-, flowers, etc.) all from our own garden.