Sunset in Elim. Anno 1824

Elim was founded and grounded as a missionary station in 1824. Wikipedia mentions that the thatchers from this village are ‘renowned’. That is a bit of an understatement as they in fact belong to the best thatchers in the world knowing that many of them are travelling around the globe engaged in prestigious thatching for the ‘bold and the beautiful’ wether it is in Australia, Dubai or somewhere in the Americas. Anyway I was there to picture a sunset and arrived  at the right day and at the right time but only has a time frame of 5 minutes to shoot all the desired pictures. Some of the images were made outside that time frame but you will see.

There is  a guest house in this village, the people have a natural hospitality, there is this old watermill but for petrol (gasoline, diesel) you will have to drive 20 odd kilometres. Excellent destination for people from where ever who are sick and bored of the ordinary tourist traps. Elim is about 20 km from a stunning non-touristic sand beach, 35 km from the Southernmost point of the African Continent and 50 km from where I live. There is a little supermarket and crime is unheard of.

Impression of a day in the vineyard

Last week I submitted 3 posts about the grape harvest, the grape processing and, the most interesting part, the wine tasting. All pictures were shot at Springfontein Winery in our village Stanford, South Africa. The vineyards are located in a unique setting between lagoon and ocean. The terroir is sandy with lime scales (if we understood it correctly) and it’s an excellent underground for the South African grape varieties Pinotage and Chenin Blanc.

Anyway I made an impression (imaginary) of a day in the vineyard. Thanks to wonderful owners, management and other staff. I (and my wife Yvonne) really enjoyed your great hospitality!!!

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Friendship in Stanford.

Took this shot last month. These little guys showed me around in their location (township) near our village. Forgot their names (Xhosa names are sometimes difficult to pronounce; especially for relative outsiders) but they turned out to be great guides and great friends. I learned and experienced a bit of the harsh conditions quite a few people in South Africa undergo on a daily base.

Out of gratitude for their warm and personal hospitality:

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