The trick that did it.

Last Sunday I had difficulties in photographing a chameleon nearby the beach in Die Kelders between Stanford and Gansbaai. Only when I put my camera in the bag the little creeper came out of his hiding. Whenever I opened the bag it rushed to its hiding in the rocks. That repeated a few times until I did as if I was putting my camera in the bag. After it realized that the camera is a harmless instrument the chameleon posed patiently provided I did not come too close. Beautiful creature! Locally people call this chameleon ‘Bloukopmannetjie’ (‘Little Blue Head Man’) and you find them all over. These are shy animals and will only come nearby (but not too) if you sit still for a while. The portraits are made with a Sigma 70-300 mm macro lens fully zoomed in.

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Shot some ducks, just now

Just now, this late afternoon, I made a long walk with our dog and my camera along our road and back along the other side of the ‘Vlei’ (natural water reservoir of our village) and that is where I shot these ducks with the sun opposite me behind the trees.

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The hidden waterfall

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The hike (approx. 5 km) took a few hours and we had to climb and descent rocks, walk through a fern forest and follow a stream but the reward was amazing and refreshing: the hidden waterfall of Stanford, South Africa and only the very, very privileged know about it. Not that we are that ‘very, very privileged’ but our friends are and they have, after 16 years Stanford, obtained the key for the gate. A ┬áparadise for whoever want to take photographs of waterfalls and streaming water; frogs and other creatures, fynbos and other precious plants. Well we guess that the Garden of Eden must have looked alike. Our time was limited this Sunday morning for there were also lunch arrangements but we definitely will return for a day or longer to picture it all.

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