It’s purple and in our garden

This Adenia (origin Southern Africa) has a diameter of about 75 cm. In an optimal environment the caudex can grow to a height and with of 2.5 meter. It survived our garden (the very South of South Africa) for the last 23 months but let’s see a day, a week, a month and a year at the time. Our expectations are high!!! 🙂

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Bulbine natalensis

The reddish rootstock of the Bulbine natalensis (syn. Bulbine latiafolia) is  known as one of the three main ingredients for natural medicins of the traditional healers in South Africa. A previous minister of health advertised it even as a medicin against HIV-AIDS at an international convention in Canada and we all had a big laugh about it. But now it seems that the pharmaceutical industry is looking into the healing properties of the plant as they do with other plants known and used for many generations by traditional healers. Rastas in Southern Africa grain the rootstock and use it in their tea for ‘blood cleansing’ as they call it. Anyway; the plant has beautiful small flowers…

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In perspective

This image of a landscape was made last Sunday near a wine cellar 15 kilometer North of Stanford in the Western Cape, South Africa. The distance to the Riviersonderend Mountains in the background is about 40 kilometer. Picture made with 300mm zoom. Yes; we are far sighted.

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Growing with the wind

White Milkwood  (Sideroxylon inerme) occur mainly in coastal areas in Southern Africa and they tend to grow with the wind.

Here a few along the ‘Wandelpad’ (hiking trail) in our village.

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Whale Watching

Just to attract more tourists the tourism bureau in Hermanus announced that the first whales were spotted. This turned out to be a hoax for nobody living and working along the coastline has seen one yet…. Even the subsidized ‘Whale Horn Blower’ (guy who blows the horn when a whale is seen) hasn’t been spotted… But we saw this morning a whale tail coming out of the water …. of a fountain…

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Again in the garden

Both, my wife and I, like flowers. Maybe it’s our Dutch background (“Dutch say it with flowers”) but more likely it has to do with the restoration and extension of a historical botanical garden in South Africa that has kept us busy between April 2000 and July 2011. Anyway you find me every day in our garden with my camera and virtually every day there is something new. We live in an area with a subtropical climate (climate zone 10); ideal for succulent plants including cacti. Here are some pictures I shot during the last week or so.

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