The Great Disappearing Act

‘Creepy’ has many meanings but in the context of this Weekly Photo Challenge I had the sudden association with people who walk away in the middle of a conversation. Yes there are people like that. And, strange enough, not always because of the subject does not interest them; sometimes they come back on that during another conversation. But whatever the reason I always find it discomforting and impolite. Am I sounding like an ‘old fart’ now?

For this weekly challenge I sourced an imaginary from my archives. I gave it the title ‘The Great Disappearing Act’.

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Late lunch in the tree

No very appropriate on top of the previous post (subject wise, I mean) but this is what I just witnessed. So I keep it to thumbnails you can enlarge if you want. Pity I don’t have an 800 mm lens… thus the pictures are severely cropped; another reason for thumbnails … πŸ˜‰

BTW the predator is a Peregrine Falcon.

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It’s a Cactus

From Mexico is the Pelecyphora asceliformis. There is no common name for this cactus as far as I know. But I do know that it grows (very slowly; this is a 12 yrs old one grown from seed) in our garden. Ideal subject for B&W photography.

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It's a Cactus

From Mexico is the Pelecyphora asceliformis. There is no common name for this cactus as far as I know. But I do know that it grows (very slowly; this is a 12 yrs old one grown from seed) in our garden. Ideal subject for B&W photography.

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Nguni cattle

There is not much literature about the African Nguni cattle. But there is this book “The Abundant Herds – a celebration to the Nguni cattle of the Zulu people” that’s worthwhile to read and is well illustrated. Written and illustrated by Marguerite Poland, David Hammond and Leigh Voigt and partly based on the study of Bert Schroeder (RIP). ISBN 978-1-874950-70-7; published by Fernwood Press/Random House Struik. Why I’m mentioning all this? Well… I grew up in an agricultural environment dominated by Holsteiners (and its varieties), Simmenthalers, Angus etc. in Europe. These are the most common breeds of cattle around the globe. Africa has its own cattle and we all have to credit the Zulu people for magnificent name giving (based on the hide patterns) but first of all for their efforts to keep the Nguni pure. Nguni cattle play an important role in the Zulu, Xhosa and Sotho cultures in Southern Africa. In a typical Zulu village the kraal is always the center point. It provided the villagers not only with milk and meat; it also served as bridal dowry (“lobola”). The more lighter the hide the higher the status of the owner. Shaka Zulu bred white Nguni cattle and his elite guards were recognized by their white hides. There is so much to tell about this disease resistant type of cattle. You see them grazing in Northern parts of South Africa but the last years farmers in other parts of this country discover the (commercial) advantages of this breed. In our small village for example are already 4 herds of which we know and a fifth one on its way. As I’m asked to picture Nguni cattle for a hide trader I snapshooted, by means of photographic study, quickly some Ngunis on my way to another photographic subject early this.

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