A stroll through both sides of the village

The first day of this month I had a stroll through both sides of the village with good friend and colleague Annalize Mouton. ‘Both sides’ I mention because 20 years after ‘Apartheid’ there are still barriers between the different cultures. Anyway Annalize published an extensive report on her blog ‘Portrait of a village‘.

The stroll was a challenge for both of us and not some kind of silly competition (as some people thought); the idea behind it was to photograph the same subjects with each individual view of things. Annalize is a traditional photographer (‘educated’ by her “Old School” husband Maré) while I like to see the more quirky side of life (hence the ‘twist’ -not always noted- in some of my more ‘traditional looking’ images). Usually I picture subjects with which I have some affinity. The challenge of this occasion was to picture also less interesting things. An example is the Anglican church at the Village Green. Annalize ‘complained’ that she was never able to picture it to her full satisfaction. Indeed; it’s not easy to photograph this (sloppy restored) historic building in the way every photographer would like it. I’m not satisfied either with the result but succeeded, as we were passing by, to ‘snap-shoot’ the filtered sun through the ‘bell-tower’.

Well; here my part of the 3 hour stroll:

 

On the building site

Friends of us who recently moved to the village and open their restaurant in a few months time like to build and restore in the traditional way. Materials (like tatch) are resourced as close by as possible and the construction of this roof window is also something not many people dare to undertake nowadays.

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The brick-maker left his signature

Look the the marks on some of the bricks (locally handcrafted in traditional way).

This picture will be the background in a serie of 10 ‘Imaginary Street Art’ pictures which I start publishing in this blog from tomorrow onwards on a daily base.

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African potato in flower

The bulb of the ‘African potato’ is one of the three main ingredients traditional healers in Southern Africa use in their medicin recipes. Even a des-integrating flower has its charm!

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African potato

… in flower. This is a bulb plant. Traditional medicin men/women (sangomas) in Southern Africa use it for a variety of healing purposes.

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Mac Tatcher

Mac Tatcher is THE Tatcher everyone in our village knows. He grew up in Elim (from old the place where the best South African tatchers come from) and moved to Stanford one day. There he has a thriving little business. He knows how to build a roof, where to get the best tatch but asking for his original family name … well…. “Everybody knows me as Mac Tatcher”.

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